LOGIN

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive

The excessive and unregulated use of drugs which is popularly called drug abuse or drug addiction has emerged as a major social problem recently and has crossed the border of caste, class, creed, sex and nation.

It is like curse for developing country like India as it has already existing problems like poverty, unemployment and overpopulation. Drug abuse affects individuals, their families and the society as a whole. Drug abuse often leads to crime as a result of reduced impulse control, paranoia and negligence. Thus, effects the law and order, economic production and human welfare.

Drug abuse implies physical dependence upon a drug including the development of tolerance and withdrawal. An addict who develops tolerance requires more and more of the drug to transport him to the world of fantasies. If the addict is not allowed to take the drug he suffers from painful and uncontrollable convulsions, vomiting, depression and various other maladies.

If one looks at the causes of the spread of this evil, the changes in the traditional pattern of society emerge as the major one. Rapid industrialization and urbanization have ushered in a new way of life with new values like individualism and permissiveness. This has resulted in loosening of informal means of social control, for example, influences of conventional sophistication but have low frustration tolerance. the stresses and strains of modern life with resulting frustration and depression give rise of escapist tendencies. Way to materialism and consumerism and the resulting alienation also ha a bearing on the present day trend. Anonymity of our big cities is providing a favorable environment of drug addicts.

Family has also shown changes in its structure and function recently. As a result parental control is less today because of the working situation of both parents. Break up of joint family also means less control over the young people. Stressful home environment and broken home are often the contributory factors. If a child\'s basic needs like security, response, recognition and development are not adequately met at home, he develops feelings of inadequacy, frustration and emotional insecurity. He seeks to derive satisfaction fro nay other sources and comes in contact with unscrupulous persons. Delinquent gangs or pear group fulfill various needs of a dissatisfied adolescent and provide rationalization to engage in drug-use. Failure or maladjustment at school and unable to satisfy-expectations of their parents leads many a young man to drug addiction.

Thus, drug abuse is a multifaceted problem which has to be tackled in the social context. A comprehensive approach towards awareness building, preventive education, counseling and guidance, do-addiction, follow-up and rehabilitation of addicts in needed. And in this task the governmental efforts have to be vigorously supported by the collective initiatives of people themselves. Parents, teachers, social workers, opinion leaders, youth and voluntary organization have to play an important role to motivate the youth to keep away from drugs.

Besides the family, peer groups and teachers, counselors and guides have an important role to play in the strategy for prevention of drug abuse. Schools, colleges and other educational institutions should-provide facility for personal, vocational and educational guidance and also encourage them to make use of such facilities. Adolescents specially need training to develop self-control, tolerance, strengthening their identify and development of self-concept to face the world boldly. A drug addict being a helpless individual may not come forward for treatment or counseling. So he must be carefully supervised by someone close to him. Providing hope and trust a drug addict should be rehabilitated.

Counseling helps an addict to change his behavior and adapt a new attitude and values. Counseling is deliberate effort to help a person to sort out his problems in a rational way, to clarify the conflicts and issues in this life and to discuss the feasibilities of various courses of action. this is done to enable the persons to assume the responsibility of making choices.

Legal measures are necessary to dal with the rising trend of drug addiction. narcotic and Psychotropic Substances Act 1985 and Prevention of Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act 1988 have been brought into force all over the country to deal with the problem more effectively. The former Act provides for punishment of rigorous imprisonment for 10 years, which may extend to 30 years and also a minimum fine of Rs. 1 lakh. With the death penalty introduced and the forfeiture of assets, it ranks now as one of the very powerful laws and one of the highest deterrents. Even consumption of narcotic drugs is an offence under the Act with punishment ranging from 6 months to 1 year. However, an addict can be given a one time change by the court to seek treatment.

It is essential to create awareness among people about the horrible consequences of drug addiction. Radio, TV, Newspapers, Cinema, theatre, Drama, Street plays, voluntary organizations\' efforts etc. are the important means to create an awareness and consciousness of the prevention of drug abuse Socio-cultural programmes including essay, debate, poster competitions, film shows, exhibitions etc. need to be promoted in education institutions.

Any society can survive only on certain principles of morality and orderly behavior. This had been stressed by several thinkers. It is not too late to release the seriousness of the problem of drug addiction. This could be the most suitable occasion to quote Aldous Huxley\"... pen is mightier than sword. But mightier than the pen or the sword is the pill\". Huxley\'s point emphasizes the possibility of pill, al consuming. before such a catastrophe overtakes our youth, we must act.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive

A good article from HelpAgeIndia:

S. No.

Problem

Need

1

Failing Health

Health

2

Economic insecurity

Economic security

3

Isolation

Inclusion

4

Neglect

Care

5

Abuse

Protection

6

Fear

Reassurance

7

Boredom (idleness)

Be usefully occupied

8

Lowered self-esteem

Self Confidence

9

Loss of control

Respect

10

Lack of Preparedness for old age

Preparedness for old age

Equity Issues are relevant to all the above

   

 

 

Failing Health
It has been said that “we start dying the day we are born”. The aging process is synonymous with failing health. While death in young people in countries such as India is mainly due to infectious diseases, older people are mostly vulnerable to non-communicable diseases. Failing health due to advancing age is complicated by non-availability to good quality, age-sensitive, health care for a large proportion of older persons in the country. In addition, poor accessibility and reach, lack of information and knowledge and/or high costs of disease management make reasonable elder care beyond the reach of older persons, especially those who are poor and disadvantaged.

To address the issue of failing health, it is of prime importance that good quality health care be made available and accessible to the elderly in an age-sensitive manner. Health services should address preventive measures keeping in mind the diseases that affect – or are likely to affect – the communities in a particular geographical region. In addition, effective care and support is required for those elderly suffering from various diseases through primary, secondary and tertiary health care systems. The cost (to the affected elderly individual or family) of health has to be addressed so that no person is denied necessary health care for financial reasons. Rehabilitation, community or home based disability support and end-of-life care should also be provided where needed, in a holistic manner, to effectively address the issue to failing health among the elderly.

 

Economic Insecurity
The problem of economic insecurity is faced by the elderly when they are unable to sustain themselves financially. Many older persons either lack the opportunity and/or the capacity to be as productive as they were. Increasing competition from younger people, individual, family and societal mind sets, chronic malnutrition and slowing physical and mental faculties, limited access to resources and lack of awareness of their rights and entitlements play significant roles in reducing the ability of the elderly to remain financially productive, and thereby, independent.

Economic security is as relevant for the elderly as it is for those of any other age group. Those who are unable to generate an adequate income should be facilitated to do so. As far as possible, elderly who are capable, should be encouraged, and if necessary, supported to be engaged in some economically productive manner. Others who are incapable of supporting themselves should be provided with partial or full social welfare grants that at least provide for their basic needs. Families and communities may be encouraged to support the elderly living with them through counseling and local self-governance.

 

Isolation
Isolation, or a deep sense of loneliness, is a common complaint of many elderly is the feeling of being isolated. While there are a few who impose it on themselves, isolation is most often imposed purposefully or inadvertently by the families and/or communities where the elderly live. Isolation is a terrible feeling that, if not addressed, leads to tragic deterioration of the quality of life.

It is important that the elderly feel included in the goings-on around them, both in the family as well as in society. Those involved in elder care, especially NGOs in the field, can play a significant role in facilitating this through counseling of the individual, of families, sensitization of community leaders and group awareness or group counseling sessions. Activities centered on older persons that involve their time and skills help to inculcate a feeling of inclusion. Some of these could also be directly useful for the families and the communities.

 

Neglect
The elderly, especially those who are weak and/or dependent, require physical, mental and emotional care and support. When this is not provided, they suffer from neglect, a problem that occurs when a person is left uncared for and that is often linked with isolation. Changing lifestyles and values, demanding jobs, distractions such as television, a shift to nuclear family structures and redefined priorities have led to increased neglect of the elderly by families and communities. This is worsened as the elderly are less likely to demand attention than those of other age groups.

The best way to address neglect of the elderly is to counsel families, sensitise community leaders and address the issue at all levels in different forums, including the print and audio-visual media. Schools and work places offer opportunities where younger generations can be addressed in groups. Government and non-government agencies need to take this issue up seriously at all these levels. In extreme situations, legal action and rehabilitation may be required to reduce or prevent the serious consequences of the problem.


Abuse
The elderly are highly vulnerable to abuse, where a person is willfully or inadvertently harmed, usually by someone who is part of the family or otherwise close to the victim. It is very important that steps be taken, whenever and wherever possible, to protect people from abuse. Being relatively weak, elderly are vulnerable to physical abuse. Their resources, including finances ones are also often misused. In addition, the elderly may suffer from emotional and mental abuse for various reasons and in different ways.

The best form of protection from abuse is to prevent it. This should be carried out through awareness generation in families and in the communities. In most cases, abuse is carried out as a result of some frustration and the felt need to inflict pain and misery on others. It is also done to emphasize authority. Information and education of groups of people from younger generations is necessary to help prevent abuse. The elderly should also be made aware of their rights in this regard.

Where necessary, legal action needs be taken against those who willfully abuse elders, combined with counseling of such persons so as to rehabilitate them. Elderly who are abused also require to be counseled, and if necessary rehabilitated to ensure that they are able to recover with minimum negative impact.

 

Fear

Many older persons live in fear. Whether rational or irrational, this is a relevant problem face by the elderly that needs to be carefully and effectively addressed.

Elderly who suffer from fear need to be reassured. Those for whom the fear is considered to be irrational need to be counseled and, if necessary, may be treated as per their needs. In the case of those with real or rational fear, the cause and its preventive measures needs to be identified followed by appropriate action where and when possible.

Boredom (Idleness)
Boredom is a result of being poorly motivated to be useful or productive and occurs when a person is unwilling or unable to do something meaningful with his/her time. The problem occurs due to forced inactivity, withdrawal from responsibilities and lack of personal goals. A person who is not usefully occupied tends to physically and mentally decline and this in turn has a negative emotional impact. Most people who have reached the age of 60 years or more have previously led productive lives and would have gained several skills during their life-time. Identifying these skills would be a relatively easy task. Motivating them and enabling them to use these skills is a far more challenging process that requires determination and consistent effort by dedicated people working in the same environment as the affected elders.

Many elderly can be trained to carry out productive activities that would be useful to them or benefit their families, communities or environment; activities that others would often be unable or unwilling to do. Being meaningfully occupied, many of the elderly can be taught to keep boredom away. For others, recreational activities can be devised and encouraged at little or no additional cost.

Lowered Self-esteem
Lowered self-esteem among older persons has a complex etiology that includes isolation, neglect, reduced responsibilities and decrease in value or worth by one-self, family and/or the society.

To restore self-confidence, one needs to identify and address the cause and remove it. While isolation and neglect have been discussed above, self-worth and value can be improved by encouraging the elderly to take part in family and community activities, learning to use their skills, developing new ones or otherwise keeping themselves productively occupied. In serious situations, individuals – and their families – may require counseling and/or treatment.

Loss of Control
This problem of older persons has many facets. While self-realization and the reality of the situation is acceptable to some, there are others for whom life becomes insecure when they begin to lose control of their resources – physical strength, body systems, finances (income), social or designated status and decision making powers.

Early intervention, through education and awareness generation, is needed to prevent a negative feeling to inevitable loss of control. It is also important for society – and individuals – to learn to respect people for what they are instead of who they are and how much they are worth. When the feeling is severe, individuals and their families may be counseled to deal with this. Improving the health of the elderly through various levels of health care can also help to improve control. Finally, motivating the elderly to use their skills and training them to be productive will help gain respect and appreciation.

Lack of Preparedness for Old Age
A large number of people enter ‘old age’ with little, or no, awareness of what this entails. While demographically, we acknowledge that a person is considered to be old when (s)he attains the age of 60 years, there is no such clear indicator available to the individual. For each person, there is a turning point after which (s)he feels physiologically or functionally ‘old’. This event could take place at any age before or after the age of 60. Unfortunately, in India, there is almost no formal awareness program – even at higher level institutions or organizations – for people to prepare for old age. For the vast majority of people, old age sets in quietly, but suddenly, and few are prepared to deal with its issues. Most people living busy lives during the young and middle age periods may prefer to turn away from, and not consider, the possible realities of their own impending old age.
The majority of Indians are unaware of the rights and entitlements of older persons.

The problem of not being prepared for old age can only be prevented. Awareness generation through the work place is a good beginning with HR departments taking an active role in preparing employees to face retirement and facing old age issues. For the majority who have unregulated occupations and for those who are self-employed, including farmers, awareness can be generated through the media and also through government offices and by NGOs in the field. Older people who have faced and addressed these issues can be ‘recruited’ to address groups at various forums to help people prepare for, or cope with, old age.

 

User Rating: 1 / 5

Star activeStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive

To most educated Indians old age is a curse because they spend a lonely and insipid life, not realizing that mental retirement is detrimental to their well-being at old age. They suddenly stop being enthusiastic about life’s small pleasures and in doing so, mentally prepare themselves for a vegetative life - eating, sleeping, watching TV and indulging in trivial things

People in old age suffer from various problems and for a variety of reasons. Most of them suffer from decease like arthritis, blood sugar, heart ailments and so on and so forth. They would have spent all their life’s earnings in discharging their parental duties and are totally dependent on their children for their existence in their fag end of their life.

There are various stories about the death of one elderly woman who did suicide in the compound of the house because the other brother did not allow the mother to come in. These are the reverse side of development going in family’s breakup. Here are some of the thoughts to be considered by the elderly people who are passing through this type of life style in joint family.

Old age homes are no solutions to the problems confronting the elderly. I have seen and virtually lived with old and ailing people in old age homes where their basic wants are taken care of.

 

But are they all happy with this kind of life at the fag end of their lives? No, certainly not.

Some tips for senior citizens from KindHeartz:

  1. Never give away your everything to your children while you are alive. Keep sufficient for yourself.
  2. Elderly people ought to have deep love, compassion and sympathy to all the members Of the family equally without any partiality to any one of them.
  3. They should communicate to all family members daily or at several times inquiring About their health and birthdays and important days of life they ought enjoy in Celebration such important incidents in life.
  4. No interference to any member of the family or discussing any personal matters of the family without any reference to them.
  5. Try to help them by taking care of the grand children as the family love for them. Do Not utter anything about caring about them. This is the family love, family values and Family unity with which the elderly came to this country with that type of mission in Life.
  6. Try to tell stories of our ancient saints to small children and grand children so that they Can follow our religious traditions, beliefs and understanding of our cultural heritage. And our own languages.
  7. Don't be angry with any one, remain tolerant and be sympathetic and polite to Everybody in the house. Note that love, compassion and deep gratitude.s are main aspects of human life.
  8. Try to go to the library and pass some of our time to know what is happening in this country. Be active in life. Depend upon yourself in all activities of life.
  9. Who are able and are driving cars, they can volunteer some services to some organizations, temples or hospitals for helping needy people.
  10. Every body should try to be independent in driving cars or knowing bus and railway facilities for going from place to place.
  11. Keep the lists of friends for advice and consultations and remain in contact with them so that loneliness is broken and you feel well.
  12. Take care of your partner and always go out for a walk, do some exercises in the house or on the cycle machine or any other machines so as to keep bather health. Always be particular to take medications in time. Check blood pressure and blood sugar for the prevention of the further spread of any diseases.

 

 

 

 

 

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive

Loneliness - A common problem among the elderly

Not all senior citizens who live alone are lonely. Loneliness depends on whether the person has been forced by circumstances to live alone. If they feel that they are abandoned by their families, it increases their vulnerability towards depression.

Signs of Loneliness and Depression

Physical symptoms such as body pain and loss of sleep are usually signs of depression. Most senior citizens only talk about their physical problems. It is important that doctors recognize these symptoms.

How to Deal with Loneliness

It is important that they involve themselves in activities and exercise. However, one cannot start this at old age. Everyone must prepare for old age when they are younger. Senior citizens should indulge in physical, recreational, social and religious activities to avoid loneliness.

Believe me the preparation should start at young age. If you are not social when young, it would be extremely hard to change yourself when old

 

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive

Some of the forms of elder abuse are listed as under:

a) Physical-

For example, hitting, punching, slapping, burning, pushing, kicking, restraining, false imprisonment/confinement, or giving excessive or improper medication

 

b) Psychological/Emotional-

A perpetrator who identifies something that matters to an older person and then uses it to coerce an older person into a particular action. It may take verbal forms such as name-calling, ridiculing, constantly criticizing, accusations, blaming, or non-verbal forms such as ignoring, silence or shunning.

 

c) Financial abuse-

Also known as financial exploitation e.g. illegal or unauthorized use of a person’s property, money, pension book or other valuables (including changing the person\'s will to name the abuser as heir). It may be obtained by deception, coercion, misrepresentation, undue influence, or theft. This includes fraudulently obtaining or use of a power of attorney. Other forms include deprivation of money or other property, or by eviction from own home.

 

d) Scam by strangers-

Worthless \"sweepstakes\" that elderly persons must pay in order to collect winnings, fraudulent investment schemes, predatory lending, and lottery scams.

 

e) Sexual-

For example, forcing a person to take part in any sexual activity without his or her consent, including forcing them to participate in conversations of a sexual nature against their will; may also include situations where person is no longer able to give consent (dementia)

 

f) Neglect-

For example, depriving a person of food, heat, clothing or comfort or essential medication and depriving a person of needed services to force certain kinds of actions, financial and otherwise. The deprivation may be intentional (active neglect) or happen out of lack of knowledge or resources (passive neglect).

 

g) Abandonment-

Deserting a dependent person with the intent to abandon them or leave them unattended at a place for such a time period as may be likely to endanger their health or welfare.

 

h)Rights abuse-

Denying the civil and constitutional rights of a person who is old, but not declared by court to be mentally incapacitated. This is an aspect of elder abuse that is increasingly being recognized and adopted by nations

 

i)Self-neglect-

Elderly people neglecting themselves by not caring about their own health or safety. Self-neglect (harm by self) is treated as conceptually different as abuse (harm by others).

 

j) Separation from family-

Older people may be left behind as families are displaced by conflict or natural disasters – because they are unwilling or unable to travel, or are left to guard family property and belongings. Isolation in the form of fragmentation and dissolution of their families and communities may lead to the loss of support mechanisms on which they had relied.

 

k) Caring for children-

If they were not doing so already before the crisis, many older people find themselves looking after young dependants whose parents are dead or absent. The elderly by default of tradition end up becoming the caretakers of the grand children which takes a toll on their physical and mental wellbeing unless done out of love otherwise.

 

l) Having housing, land and property rights ignored-

In a ‘survival-of-the-fittest’ environment, the already difficult issue of housing, land and property rights may become intractable if the rightful holder is an older person.

 

m) Unequal share within the family and Lack of basic necessities-

Older people may be unable to consume some items because they lack the physical ability they once had. Furthermore, there is a meager circulation of goods designed particularly for the old.

 

n) Susceptibility to ill health and difficulties accessing health services-

Poor health and reduced mobility increase the risk of serious injury and illness in crisis situations. Even normal physical changes associated with ageing that may not greatly impair daily functioning, such as reduced mobility and failing eyesight, can become significantly disabling during an emergency.

 

o) Choosing not to report abuse-

Victims of elder abuse and neglect may feel ashamed of their abusive experiences. Those who consider reporting abuse often choose not to because, in the majority of cases, they are abused by a family member, loved one, or trusted caregiver. It can be extremely difficult to tell others that someone you trust and love is abusing or neglecting you. Making matters worse, abusers often blame their victims, telling them that the abuse is their “fault,” and threatening them if they reveal

the abuse to anyone. If the older person is dependent on the abuser for care, he or she may feel as if he or she has no option but to live in fear and pain.

 

p) Traditional Rituals-

For example, a village in Tamil Nadu where they perform euthanasia on elderly individuals, who are incapable of performing productive labour.

 

Source: http://agewell-initiatives.blogspot.in/

 

LEAF Society
Namakkal